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Podcast: Teaching self-driving cars to read, improving bike safety with a video game, and when ‘you’ isn’t about ‘you’

This week, new estimates for the depths of the world’s lakes, a video game that could help kids be safer bike riders, and teaching autonomous cars to read road signs with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Ariana Orvell joins Sarah Crespi to discuss her study of how the word “you” is used when people recount meaningful experiences. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: VisualCommunications/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
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Breazeale Nuclear Reactor Start up, 500kW, 1MW, and Shut Down
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Backchat: March 2017

A sting operation finds several predatory journals offered to employ a fictional, unqualified academic as an editor. Plus, the Great Barrier Reef in hot water, and trying to explain 'time crystals'.

Nature Podcast: 23 March 2017

This week, peering into a black hole, reorganising the dinosaur family tree and finding drug combos for cancer.
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Podcast: The archaeology of democracy, new additions to the uncanny valley, and the discovery of ant-ibiotics

This week, what bear-mounted cameras can tell us about their caribou-hunting habits, ants that mix up their own medicine, and feeling alienated by emotional robots with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Lizzie Wade joins Sarah Crespi to discuss new thinking on the origins of democracy outside of Europe, based on archeological sites in Mexico. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: rpbirdman/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Podcast: Ants that brew their own antibiotics, new residents for uncanny valley, and archaeological evidence for early democratic societies in the Americas

This week, what bear-mounted cameras can tell us about their caribou-hunting habits, ants that mix up their own medicine, and feeling alienated by emotional robots with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Lizzie Wade joins Sarah Crespi to discuss new thinking on the origins of democracy outside of Europe, based on archeological sites in Mexico. Listen to previous podcasts. [Image: rpbirdman/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Nature Podcast: 16 March 2017

This week, making plane fuel greener, yeast chromosomes synthesised from scratch, and seeking out hidden HIV.
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Ep. 443: Destroy and Rebuild Pt. 7: Tsunamis

Surf’s up! Today we’re going to be talking about one of the most devastating natural disasters out there: tsunamis. We’re talking huge waves that wreck the seashore. But it turns out, there many ways you can get a tsunami, and one of those has to do with space.
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REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast - March 1918

As the First World War draws to an end, astronomer Arthur Eddington sets out on a challenging mission: to prove Einstein’s new theory of general relativity by measuring a total eclipse. The experiment became a defining example of how science should be done.

Podcast: Human pheromones lightly debunked, ignoring cyberattacks, and designer chromosomes

This week, how Flickr photos could help predict floods, why it might be a good idea to ignore some cyberattacks, and new questions about the existence of human pheromones with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Sarah Richardson joins Alexa Billow to discuss a global project to build a set of working yeast chromosomes from the ground up. Read Sarah Richardson’s research in Science. Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: Drew Gurian; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
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Nature Podcast: 9 March 2017

This week, the earliest known life, Neanderthal self-medication, and data storage in a single atom.
By creating a foam that is attracted to oil it is possible to create a sponge that can soak up oil from water
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Ep. 442: Destroy and Rebuild Pt. 6: Magnetic Pole Reversal

If we look back into the geologic record of the Earth, it appears that our planet’s magnetic field flips polarity every few hundred thousand years or so. Why does this happen? When’s it supposed to happen next? Is it dangerous?
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